ABOUT Richard Herrmann


BIO

Richard Herrmann is an Internationally published outdoor and underwater photographer. He comes from the fields of marine and terrestrial environmental science. A professional photographer since 1986, Richard’s images have appeared in many of the world’s best known publications, including National Geographic Magazine, Time, Newsweek, Outside, BBC Wildlife, Outdoor Life, Ranger Rick and many more.

He was the still photographer in 1990 for the Jacques Cousteau’s Rediscovery of the World Philippines Expedition on Calypso and has won first prize in the world’s two most prestigious nature photographic competitions: the BBC Wildlife Photographer of the Year and Nature’s Best. He has also won a 2nd prize at the International POY (“Pictures of the Year”) awards. An accomplished presenter and speaker, Richard has given presentations to companies and organizations such as: Qualcomm, American Chemical Society, London Museum of Natural History, The Smithsonian, and UCSD Television.

Richard’s assignments include a three-year assignment on the Disney / Galatee Films movie, “OCEANS” which opened in April 2010. In 2008 he combined work for Galatee Films and technical support for IMAX / Howard Hall Productions on “Uder the Sea 3D” in locations such as New Guinea and Bali. In 2005-2006, Richard worked on the IMAX “Deep Sea 3D” film in the Bahamas, the Sea of Cortez, California and Hawaii.  Richard lives in Poway, California with his wife Ginny. 22-year-old daughter, Emilie, is off to school in San Francisco, California.



Day at Work 

In June, 2006 I was fortunate to get a three-year assignment with the French Film company, Galatée Films. I spent 40 days that June shooting blue whales, krill, kelp paddies and bait balls off San Diego. Another 12-day shoot followed at the Channel Islands. In February and March 2007, I did another 43 days concentrating on blue whales in Loreto, Baja California. May took me to the Azores for blue whales once again. 


Many of our 12-hour days were spent like this, in small hard hulled inflatables, with no cover, in the hot Baja California sun.

In October, 2009, I did something completely different.  I photographed historic artifacts for an archaeologuy firm that had been collected from the “Manhattan Project” site at Hanford, Washington.  The artificially created city numbered close to 40,000 at its peak during the WW11 effort.  The residents did not know what project they were working on till they received pins that read “Atom Bomb”…after the bombs were dropped on Japan!


Much of my field work involves diving from small boats, like this small inflatable. getting 30lb. weight belts, dry suits and camera gear in and out of the water can be a challenge! However, to get in good position for some shots, you have to use a smaller boat.

Much of my field work involves diving from small boats, like this small inflatable. getting 30lb. weight belts, dry suits and camera gear in and out of the water can be a challenge! However, to get in good position for some shots, you have to use a smaller boat.


LAND WORK
I have done quite a few assignments now for The Nature Conservancy. These jobs have required a 4-wheel drive vehicle and remote hiking. I have to understand the vegetation communities, habitats, topography and associated animals for each area I go to get great images. I also have to pay close attention to the weather so I can access areas at the best time for light. I have worked in California from Monterey to the Mexican border and into Baja California. Obviously, working like this is completley different from the underwater jobs and requires a different (and much scaled down) equipment set. The Southern California Edison work is much different, in that I was often surrounded by heavy equipment and had to keep my head on a swivel! I also had challenges with dust and flying dirt which required extra protection for my lenses and camera bodies.  My most recent assignment in April 2011 for The Nature Conservancy, took me to California’s Mojave and Amargosa Deserts.

LAND WORK

I have done quite a few assignments now for The Nature Conservancy. These jobs have required a 4-wheel drive vehicle and remote hiking. I have to understand the vegetation communities, habitats, topography and associated animals for each area I go to get great images. I also have to pay close attention to the weather so I can access areas at the best time for light. I have worked in California from Monterey to the Mexican border and into Baja California. Obviously, working like this is completley different from the underwater jobs and requires a different (and much scaled down) equipment set. The Southern California Edison work is much different, in that I was often surrounded by heavy equipment and had to keep my head on a swivel! I also had challenges with dust and flying dirt which required extra protection for my lenses and camera bodies.  My most recent assignment in April 2011 for The Nature Conservancy, took me to California’s Mojave and Amargosa Deserts.


EARLY WORK
In 1990 I got the job I had always dreamed about…photographer on the Calypso for the Cousteau Society. I caught the Cousteau team just at the end of their filming days. The Captain would only live a couple more years and the funding was becoming more and more difficult to come by. Although I was only on the boat for 30 days in the Philippines, I got to know Madame Cousteau quite well and was able to hear stories I had read in the “Silent World” from someone who was there from the beginning. In this photo I am on the back deck of the Calypso in the Philippines after finishing my first underwater photographic assignment. Note the vintage “silver” suit!

EARLY WORK

In 1990 I got the job I had always dreamed about…photographer on the Calypso for the Cousteau Society. I caught the Cousteau team just at the end of their filming days. The Captain would only live a couple more years and the funding was becoming more and more difficult to come by. Although I was only on the boat for 30 days in the Philippines, I got to know Madame Cousteau quite well and was able to hear stories I had read in the “Silent World” from someone who was there from the beginning. In this photo I am on the back deck of the Calypso in the Philippines after finishing my first underwater photographic assignment. Note the vintage “silver” suit!


Thank you for taking the time to explore my site.

Back to the Richard Herrmann Photography Portfolio.


Richard’s underwater photography is cutting edge. His images of wildlife photographed beneath drifting kelp in the open ocean off the California coast are especially unique and enchanting.

HOWARD HALL, HOWARD HALL PRODUCTIONS

Richard is one of our most reliable photographers on the west coast. His work is outstanding, and he’s one of the easiest of the pros to work with.

DOUG OLANDER — EDITOR, SPORT FISHING MAZAZINE
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